Houses for Sale in Edmonton

"RAISING THE REAL ESTATE BAR"

About Carter Crest, Riverbend Edmonton

Riverbend Edmonton Houses

 

Houses located within the Riverbend area, Carter Crest are bound by Terwillegar Drive on the west, Rabbit Hill Road on the north, northeast. Carter Crest features a combination of residential homes, but mainly consists of detached houses which was completed in the 1990s.

The general topography of the Carter Crest planning area is characterized by gently undulating plain, largely the result of deposits that once formed the bed of glacial Lake Edmonton.

Carter Crest is named after Robert I. Carter, a Canadian government agent who advised Americans on their immigration prospects in Canada. After numerous trips to Edmonton from his home in Ohio, he purchased a farm in what is now Terwillegar Park and named it Riverside Farm. He moved to Strathcona in 1910 and was very active in political affairs. He served on the council for rural residents, was president of the Conservation Association of Strathcona, and was a member of the Masonic Order. Carter returned to the United States with his wife in 1923.

 

View Houses for Sale in Carter Crest                               View Houses for Sale in Riverbend

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Brookside, Riverbend Edmonton Real Estate


Properies in Brookside Edmonton were some of the first homes constructed in the Riverbend Edmonton Area. In 1961, Brookside was included in a plan for phased development of the Riverbend portion of southwest Edmonton, and in 1969, Brookside was included in the Riverbend-Terwillegar Heights Outline Plan. Riverbend-Terwillegar Heights, with a predicted ultimate population of 95,000 people, was the first of Edmonton’s residential areas to be planned on such a large scale.

Housing development of Brookside proceeded ahead of the overall plan. The neighbourhood was the subject of a subdivision re-plot in 1968 and developed quickly from that time. Approximately half of the Brookside houses were completed before 1970, and 90 percent of the units were completed by 1980. Brookside is predominantly an area of single-detached homes. Most of these are executive style homes of roughly 1970s vintage, with above average-sized lots and mature landscaping.

Brookside is especially favoured by its location, which is adjacent to the Whitemud Creek Ravine. The ravine offers a natural woodland habitat, skiing, access to river valley park trails, and other recreational facilities. From the neighbourhood there are a number of scenic views of Edmonton’s Downtown. Brookside name is an indirect reference to its location, which is adjacent to Whitemud Creek.


View Homes for sale in Brookside

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 SELLER CLOSING COSTS

Before you sell your home, do your homework and estimate your closing costs to ensure you have enough money to make your move. There is nothing worse than sitting with your lawyer and not having enough funds to close your sale.

 

When a home is sold, the seller incurs various closing costs in addition to paying out the remianing balance on thier mortgage and payout penalties. Typical closing costs for a seller may include any property taxes which are in arrears, encumbrances, the cost of a real property report with compliance and/or title insurance, any permits which were not obtained earlier, real estate commissions, any provincial, GST revenue, agricultural or business taxes, liens and legal fees. If the property is a condominium, the seller may also have costs of condominium documents, unpaid condo fees, levies and the estoppel certificate. When selling a house, the sellers costs vary from a few thousand to several thousand.

 

If you are not sure if you have enough equity in your home, contact one of our real estate experts for a free home evaluation.

 

Remax Sold Sign

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 The official city description a garage suite is "a self-contained accessory dwelling above or attached to a rear detached garage, on a single detached lot which usually comes in the form of an apartment-sized living space, with its own kitchen, bathroom, and living space, on the second floor of your garage".

 

The city’s description of a garden suite is "an at-grade self-contained, accessory dwelling located in a building that is physically separate from the principal dwelling." Typically, garden suites are single storey structures built in the back yards of single detached homes and must have their own kitchen, bathroom, and living space.

 

There are several benefits of purchasing a house with a garage or garden suite or bulding on an existing house in Edmonton including ...

Garage and garden suites are great ways to add some rental income to your property to help pay down your mortgage. It eliminates the shared interior space the way you would with a basement suite. These smaller living spaces are also a great way to add some diversity to your neighbourhood because they allow a different demographic access to housing options on your street.

Garage and garden suites can keep family members near by, yet allows for more personal space. It can be a great option for keeping your parents or your children close, while still maintaining some privacy by ensuring everyone has their own space. Alternatively, some aging empty nesters have decided to downsize into their own garden or garage suite, and allow their children’s family to live nearby, in the main house.

As with any good infill project, it’s all about creating more flexible living options so every Edmontonian can choose the neighbourhood that suits them best.  For more information on Garage and Garden suites, visit the city of Edmonton's Infill website.

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What Happens if your Real Property Report does not Comply?

 If you are selling or buying a home and have been told that there is no compliance or you have a non-confirming property, Don't panic. Below is a list of benefits and drawbacks with a non-confirming property which will help you make a more informed decision.

Benefits of Non-Compliance or Non-Conformation

  • It provides documentary evidence supporting the warranties in a real estate purchase contract, and regarding issues of compliance with land use and development bylaws.
  • It provides certainty for both the buyer and seller at the time of closing regarding compliance with development issues.
  • It provides the opportunity for the buyer to have the seller remedy any deficiencies in this regard prior to or in conjunction with the closing.  
  • If a buyer decides to accept a certain deficiency, it provides both the buyer and the seller with the certainty of knowing exactly the eficiencies they are accepting.
  • It can be used to address of the above issues regarding the structures and other matters shown on the RPR, even if a compliance certificate or letter is not current (the RPR is missing structures that have been added or altered since the RPR was prepared).
  • It  can be reused, provided there are no changes to the property, the buyer can use the same RPR with compliance when they sell the property. Even where there have been changes, the same compliance can be used to support the warranties in the AREA contract to the extent of all the s
  • tructures and other matters on the existing RPR with compliance.

Drawbacks of Non-Compliance or Non-Confirmation

  • It only provides information on compliance with municipal land use and related bylaws for the exterior dimensions of structures on the land.  
  • It does not provide any information that allows a municipality to confirm or deny compliance with any interior developments.
  • It does not provide any assurance of compliance with restrictive covenants on title and compliance with any other municipal bylaws aside from the exact bylaws covered by the compliance stamp or letter.
  • A request to the municipality for a certificate may lead to a requirement for substantial alterations, relocation or destruction of certain structures.
  • Depending on the nature of the deficiencies, the buyer may not be able to recover any costs for required alterations or destruction from the seller.
  • Many municipalities will only offer a limited form of compliance or non-conformance, and Some municipalities no longer provide compliance or
  • non-conformance stamps or certificates.
  • Under the AREA contract, the warranties provided by the seller only relate to development issues and not building code issues; and while there is some debate amongst lawyers on this issue, most take the view that any building code deficiencies including the lack of building code permits are the responsibility of the buyer.
  • Can take several weeks to obtain and even if a rush fee is paid, it can still take several days.

Read more on Real Property Reports
Read more on Non-Compliance and Non-Confirmation
Read more on Title insurance

 

 

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Should I get a Real Property Report When I sell my Home?

Traditionally a Real Property Report (RPR) and compliance letter or stamp (or non-conformance, referred to throughout as simply compliance) has traditionally been the preferred method of providing security to a buyer.  However, as some municipalities no longer offer compliance documents, the contractual requirements to provide a RPR with compliance documents are increasingly difficult for sellers to meet.  It is important to ensure that you are aware of the alternatives, such as title insurance, and that the appropriate steps are taken to ensure that all parties involved are properly protected.

RPRs, compliance, and title insurance are all useful.  On their own, each has its distinct benefits and both buyers and sellers are best served when all three are in place.  However, this is often not practicable or possible. It is important for buyers and sellers to understand both the benefits and shortcomings of each one.

Benefits of a Real Property Report

  1. It provides a complete disclosure of all structures on the property, the exact location of property lines and the location of fences.
  2. It discloses the exact location of non-physical items such as easements and utility right-of-ways.
  3. It shows any encroachments by the subject property onto neighboring property (and vice versa), or easements and the exact imensions
  4. of the encroachments.
  5. It provides certainty to the buyer so they know exactly what they are buying and an opportunity to remedy any deficiencies such as encroachments before or concurrent with the closing of the purchase and sale.  
  6. If a buyer decides to accept a certain deficiency, it provides both the buyer and the seller with the certainty of knowing exactly the deficiency they are accepting.
  7. Provides documentary evidence to support the warranty in the standard AREA contract.
  8. Even an RPR that is not current (missing structures that have been added or altered since the RPR was prepared) can be used to address all the above issues regarding the structures and other matters shown on the RPR.
  9. The RPR can be reused provided there are no changes to the property.

Drawbacks of a Real Property Report

  1. On its own, it does not provide any disclosure or information as to the compliance issues which are warranted by the seller in the AREA contract.
  2. It does not provide any information on the interior portion of any of the structures of the property.
  3. It does not provide any information on “hidden items” on the property, such as the location of septic tanks or other items below ground level.
  4. The cost of an RPR is typically many times higher than the cost of title insurance, especially in outlying areas.
  5. During boom times in the oil industry, no matter the price someone is willing to pay, it can be extremely difficult to find a surveyor to do an RPR in certain parts of the province.
  6. It does not deal with many of the items covered by title insurance.
  7. It can take several weeks to obtain and even if a rush fee is paid, it can still take several days.

Read more on Real Property Reports
Read more on Non-Compliance and Non-Confirmation
Read more on Title insurance

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What is a Real Property Report?

A Real Property Report (also known as the RPR) is a legal document that clearly illustrates the location of significant visible improvements relative to property boundaries. It is a plan or illustration of the various physical features of the property, including a written statement detailing the surveyor’s opinions or concerns.

Who needs a Real Property Report?

Part of the standard real estate contracts in Alberta will have a term in the document stateing the seller will provide a current real property report with compliance report to the purchaser upon closing. Prior to putting your home on the MLS System and/or Realtor.ca, Sellers should order a new RPR to protect themselves from potential future legal liabilities resulting from problems related to property boundaries and improvements. Your REALTOR® can assist you with this process to ensure your property complies with municipal requirements.

Do I need a Real Property Report for a Condominium?

Bareland Condominiums require Real Property Reports. Conventional Condominiums do not require an RPR.

How does a Real Property Report protect you?

Purchasing a property may be the largest financial investment you ever make. With a Real Property Report, owners are aware of any boundary problems. They know whether their new home is too close to the property line, or part of their garage is on their neighbour’s land, or vice versa. Since legal complications may occur if a sold property fails to meet equirements, a Real Property Report protects the seller.

What is on a Real Property Report?

The legal location description of property and municipal address, dimensions and directions of all property boundaries, any improvements on the property, right-of-way or easements, any visible encroachments, a duly signed certification and opinion by an Alberta Land Surveyor and a permit Stamp where applicable.

How much does a Real Property Report cost?

The amount of work to prepare a Real Property Report varies between properties. Lot size and shape, number of buildings, natural features, age and availability of the property boundary information all affect the cost. However, if you are planning on selling your home in the near future, the sooner you order your Real Property Report, the more economical it will be plus any problems can be identified and resolved before a sale is finalized.

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